As we pay special tribute to women this month, Women’s History Month, it is appropriate to call attention to the important role women have played in this country’s military. For example, it has been estimated that hundreds of American women posed as men and enlisted to fight in the U.S. Civil War. The Military History News has posted an article, at https://tinyurl.com/3vbd6jjn, citing some examples of female bravery. Additional examples of women who pretended to be soldiers are in Lee Bailey’s article at https://tinyurl.com/smzr56vd . The National Archives’ Prologue Magazine (Spring 1993 issue, Vol. 25, No. 1) has a special 3-part article, Women Soldiers of the Civil War, at https://tinyurl.com/ddvaahhp. (Read the tragic account of Albert D. J. Cashier who ”enlisted in the 95th Illinois Infantry …[and] participated in approximately 40 battles and skirmishes in those long, hard four years…[and] died October 11, 1914 in an insane asylum.”) It should be noted that several books have been published on this subject. For example, Karen Abbott’s well documented book, “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War,” details the lives of Belle Boyd, Emma Edmonds, Rose O’Neal Greenhow, and Elizabeth Van Lew. Check your local library for this and/or similar references. Do a google search (www.google.com) for such topics as “women spy Civil War” or “women posing as soldiers.” We need to remember them all. They are all “unsung heroines.” New monument honors women Arlington National Cemetery has unveiled a new monument honoring all military servicewomen. Read details at https://tinyurl.com/yvtmx9yv. New help for beginners FamilySearch has recently launched a new page for family history beginners with a variety of simple family history activities and resources that “both beginners and genealogy veterans can appreciate.” Learn more at https://tinyurl.com/4s4u4dkw. Save water-soaked books With hurricane season fast approaching—along with the threat of flooding and water damage—it would be wise to read Dick Eastman’s recent Online Genealogy Newsletter article, “How to Preserve Water-Soaked Books and Papers in an Emergency,” at https://tinyurl.com/dapkavrs. “Today’s technology can usually save water-soaked documents.” Helpful facts for New York research The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society (NYG&B) has posted Frederick Wertz’s article, Helpful Facts About Immigration to New York, at https://tinyurl.com/3scwnzbh. In addition to a video, there are links to suggested resources for the different time periods in which your ancestors may have arrived, a guide to New York State census records online, tips for using Google Earth for genealogy, and more. More Google Tips Author of googleyourfamilytree.com, Daniel M. Lynch “shares essential tips for leveraging the Internet’s most powerful tool for genealogy. Read “10 Google Search Techniques for Family History Research” at https://tinyurl.com/9x5w6jyw. For example, a top tip is “Google is not generally case sensitive so genealogy, GENEALOGY, and gEnEaLoGy will all yield the same results.. …By taking the time to understand and use some essential Google filtering techniques, you can reduce the number of results …[and] increase their relevancy.” Queries, as well as a general exchange of genealogical material that readers would like to share, will be printed in the column for free. Contact Joan Griffis by e-mailing JBGriffis@aol.com.

As we pay special tribute to women this month, Women’s History Month, it is appropriate to call attention to the important role women have played in this country’s military. For example, it has been estimated that hundreds of American women posed as men and enlisted to fight in the U.S. Civil War. The Military History News has posted an article, at https://tinyurl.com/3vbd6jjn, citing some examples of female bravery. Additional examples of women who pretended to be soldiers are in Lee Bailey’s article at https://tinyurl.com/smzr56vd . The National Archives’ Prologue Magazine (Spring 1993 issue, Vol. 25, No. 1) has a special 3-part article, Women Soldiers of the Civil War, at https://tinyurl.com/ddvaahhp. (Read the tragic account of Albert D. J. Cashier who ”enlisted in the 95th Illinois Infantry …[and] participated in approximately 40 battles and skirmishes in those long, hard four years…[and] died October 11, 1914 in an insane asylum.”)

It should be noted that several books have been published on this subject. For example, Karen Abbott’s well documented book, “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War,” details the lives of Belle Boyd, Emma Edmonds, Rose O’Neal Greenhow, and Elizabeth Van Lew. Check your local library for this and/or similar references. Do a google search (www.google.com) for such topics as “women spy Civil War” or “women posing as soldiers.” We need to remember them all. They are all “unsung heroines.”

New monument honors women

Arlington National Cemetery has unveiled a new monument honoring all military servicewomen. Read details at https://tinyurl.com/yvtmx9yv.

New help for beginners

FamilySearch has recently launched a new page for family history beginners with a variety of simple family history activities and resources that “both beginners and genealogy veterans can appreciate.” Learn more at https://tinyurl.com/4s4u4dkw.

Save water-soaked books

With hurricane season fast approaching—along with the threat of flooding and water damage—it would be wise to read Dick Eastman’s recent Online Genealogy Newsletter article, “How to Preserve Water-Soaked Books and Papers in an Emergency,” at https://tinyurl.com/dapkavrs. “Today’s technology can usually save water-soaked documents.”

Helpful facts for New York research

The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society (NYG&B) has posted Frederick Wertz’s article, Helpful Facts About Immigration to New York, at https://tinyurl.com/3scwnzbh. In addition to a video, there are links to suggested resources for the different time periods in which your ancestors may have arrived, a guide to New York State census records online, tips for using Google Earth for genealogy, and more.

More Google Tips

Author of googleyourfamilytree.com, Daniel M. Lynch “shares essential tips for leveraging the Internet’s most powerful tool for genealogy. Read “10 Google Search Techniques for Family History Research” at https://tinyurl.com/9x5w6jyw. For example, a top tip is “Google is not generally case sensitive so genealogy, GENEALOGY, and gEnEaLoGy will all yield the same results.. …By taking the time to understand and use some essential Google filtering techniques, you can reduce the number of results …[and] increase their relevancy.”

Queries, as well as a general exchange of genealogical material that readers would like to share, will be printed in the column for free. Contact Joan Griffis by e-mailing JBGriffis@aol.com.

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