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This past weekend I enjoyed Easter with my family. We were only six people, but it was a true celebration. Most years, that wouldn’t be worth mentioning, but this year it was a big deal. We were able to bring four households together, sit down at the same table, and fellowship without masks …

The National Archives has created a website to help researchers prepare for the 1950 US Population Census which is due to be accessible on April 1, 2022. Since there is no name index for these records, researchers will need to take advantage of other tools available to find information on sp…

Now that the spring session of the Illinois General Assembly is underway and there have been literally thousands of proposals filed for consideration in the House and Senate, it is time to begin following bills that interest you and let your voice be heard. It is time to get in the game.

"We are not supporting doing any vaccine passports in the state of Florida," declared Gov. Ron DeSantis. "It's completely unacceptable," he said, for either government or the private sector to require showing proof of vaccination against COVID-19 "to just simply participate in normal society."

This is a “good news” story (we could use a few). I am late to the game here, as you will see, but worth the telling, and lessons to be learned.

It was a heated competition between the Wet and Dry contingents in Danville Township in April 111 years ago. The Dry voters were confident, or at least highly hopeful, the election on April 5, 1910, would eliminate demon rum and close the saloons. Some individuals predicted a Dry landslide. …

The Illinois State Genealogical Society’s (ISGS) most recent Newsletter is now available, free, at the IGHS website at https://tinyurl.com/t3je87r2. Included in this issue (Vol. 42, No. 2, March/April 2021) are Tips from the Genealogist (Land Records), Who’s Who in ISGS, The President’s Mess…

In last week’s article, you met Julie, a 45-year-old woman who, after her father, Pierre Curie died, took over his flower shop, “Le Papillon.” In addition to the incessant demands of the shop, Julie shouldered these burdens: Caretaker for her 80-year-old mother Maggie, whose health was decli…

Time machines, time travel and those scary clocks with hands that spin backwards are the stuff of sci-fi movies. But let me tell you, an old Danville Telephone Directory comes close.

I was a state agency director on three occasions back in the day, yet I don’t think I could navigate the maze of dozens of separate, and scattered, state and local social service agencies that have sprung up over the decades to address people’s problems.

“I’ve known Xi Jinping for a long time. ... He doesn’t have a democratic — with a small ‘d’ — bone in his body,” said Joe Biden in his first press conference as president, and then he ambled on:

Introduction: If a friend said, “I’m so stressed out I can’t think straight,” you’d know exactly what they meant: harsh life events called “stressors” had overwhelmed them. If your friend then said, “I can’t sleep, I’m exhausted, my stomach burns,” you’d recognize their symptoms as a “warnin…

As Women’s History Month comes to a close, there is still time to recognize some females that may have been overlooked. The National Archives Foundation has posted an interesting article, Female Inventors You Should Know, at https://tinyurl.com/fmvfb8zk.

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The Governor Bradford Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently made a donation of $2,000 toward the construction of a new exhibit called “Women of the Revolution,” which is expected to be completed and open this spring or early summer at the Vermilion County War Museum.

In the 14 days after the death of George Floyd, 19 people across the country died in violent protests. Not all the deaths were gun-related, and some of the dead were engaged in criminal activity. Nonetheless, the nation responded with shock and talked of little else in the weeks that followed.

At 11:30 p.m. October 19, 1922, a Wabash passenger train left the track at the curve two miles west of Williamsport at Schlosser woods. The engine and tender, two mail cars, four express and baggage cars plunged down a 15-foot embankment. Two other coaches left the track but did not go down …

Nancy Pelosi and her cadre of progressives continue to prove bipartisanship is an unobtainable allusion in today’s world of hyper partisanship. The Democrats are pushing out bill after bill with little if any bipartisan support such as two gun control bills recently approved essentially on p…

It was late in the evening when the big car with four men in it parked in front of the home of Ransom Lewis at 32 N. Jackson St. in Danville. Ransom was a barber and he was working late in his two-chair shop located in his home.

As the jury was being empaneled for the trial of fired police officer Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis City Council voted 13-0 to approve a record $27 million civil settlement with the family of George Floyd over his death in police custody.

My body lies stretched out upon the earth, bathed in the cool and delicious shade, bestowed by the billowing canopy of a large mulberry tree. I turn my eyes upward toward the sky and watch the spring sunlight fall and collide with drops of water and prism into miniature rainbows. Like precio…

As we pay special tribute to women this month, Women’s History Month, it is appropriate to call attention to the important role women have played in this country’s military. For example, it has been estimated that hundreds of American women posed as men and enlisted to fight in the U.S. Civi…

House Bill 374, a measure that would make it possible for Community Colleges to develop affordable housing developments, came to the Housing committee last week. I was the only Republican to vote yes on the proposal in committee.

Using the clues below, try to discover the mystery topic, which is the subject of today’s article.

The first National Women’s History Month was celebrated in March, 1980. This month, March 2021, will again be celebrated as Women’s History Month — a time to recognize the great contributions that women have made to our country. For example, the National Archives has posted information perta…

What a year! Social media is marking a year ago this week as the last week of “normal,” before COVID-19 changed everything. A news outlet I follow asked, “What are your thoughts on the past year of the pandemic?” A majority of the responses were not positive. In many ways it was the worst of times.

If you live in a place where people like to go to have fun, good for you. But if your fun place is full of Airbnbs or other short-term rentals, you may also suffer as revolving hordes of neighbors-for-the-weekend throw parties and blast music into the night.

The coffee klatch at Julie’s Café Market asks: What’s going to happen in American politics over the next few years, now that Trump has declared he plans to be the leader of the Republican Party? Here is my take.

"That attack, that siege" of the Capitol, FBI Director Chris Wray told Congress, "was criminal behavior, plain and simple, and it was behavior we at the FBI view as domestic terrorism."

Genealogist Megan Smolenyak’s recent “Genealogy Roundup” includes an article warning that “companies and foreign countries [are] vying for your DNA data” and giving away your personal data for ancestry searches is risky—to say the least. “So risky in fact that the U.S. military recently issu…

You’re driving your car when suddenly, your dashboard engine light explodes with a red, “Warning!” What to do? Take your car to a mechanic who, after running diagnostic tests, will identify, and fix the problem. Simple.

The return of the red-winged blackbirds to the bird feeder is a sure sign winter is about to fade away. Their happy song brought to mind a person I always looked forward to returning from Florida in the spring. He was Fred Vinson, who became a Florida snow bird during his sunset years.

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