The Commercial-News, Danville, IL

November 25, 2012

Questions about outdoors get answered

BY SAM VAN CAMP
Commercial-News

DANVILLE — It seems that each week I get several e-mail or questions about different aspects of the outdoors. This week, I got a question on the use of electronic game calls — Are they legal or illegal?

An electronic game call is legal to use when hunting coyotes, crows and during the Conservation Order for light geese which is a season that occurs after the Canada goose season. Check the season dates for each of these species in the Illinois Digest of Hunting and Trapping for 2012 and 2013.

Electronic game calls are illegal to use on other species of animals including Canada geese.

Landowners or those leasing land need to be aware that the Purple Paint Law, which took effect Aug. 22, 2011, required these landowners to post a ‘No Trespassing” notice at the entrance of their property.

As of Jan. 1, their property can post their land for no trespassing by marking their trees and posts with purple paint as notice to others that their land does not allow trespass.

Provisions of the Purple Paint Law are available at www.dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/Pages/PublicAct97-0477.aspx.

What are the trespassing laws in Illinois?

It is unlawful to trap or hunt, or intentionally or wantonly allow a dog to hunt within or upon the land of another, or upon waters flowing over or standing on the land of another, without first obtaining permission from the owner or tenant regardless of whether or not the land is fenced or posted.

Public hunting areas managed by the IDNR have restricted access. Refer to site-specific regulations for further details. Railroad rights-of-way are private property and permission from the owner is needed before hunting or trapping.

Illinois law does not grant the right of trespass for the purpose of retrieving wounded or crippled wildlife or hunting dogs.

Secure permission from the landowner or tenant before entering any property. Your conduct while hunting and trapping can influence the landowner’s decision to allow future hunting or trapping.

I get quite a few questions each year about trespassing and retrieving crippled wildlife on private property. Illinois law requires game bird hunters to retrieve killed or wounded birds but permission is always required first.

I encourage all hunters to retrieve their wounded and dead animals at all costs but remember to obtain permission first. This is a respect that all hunters should have for the game animals they hunt.

Sam Van Camp writes about the outdoors on Fridays and Sundays. Call him at 662-6559. Fax: 446-6648. E-mail: pamnsam@nwcable.net