The Commercial-News, Danville, IL

Z_CNHI News Service

November 12, 2013

EDITORIALS: NFL players are people too; Get serious on financial crimes

Why do we place NFL players on a pedestal?

(The Tribune-Democrat / Johnstown, Pa.)

Pro football has never been more popular, but our society is beginning to have serious discussions about the game and its future. Or at least it should be having them.

The issue of head injuries has become a driving force in the game over the past few years. Having to write a $765 million check – which is what the National Football League agreed in August to pay to settle with more than 18,000 retired players over concussion-related brain injuries – will always make a business sit up and take notice.

With what we’re learning about the very real health problems that players from the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s are facing in their post-football days, we have to wonder: Is it worth it? Players put their bodies on the line for years, knowing that could be doing long-term damage, but the love of the game and sizable paychecks kept them from worrying about what might happen to them down the road.

Still, the sport, which is thrilling to players and spectators, continues to captivate our nation. It can provide positive role models for young people. But it also produces plenty of examples that children should not follow.

The latest, if accusations are true, comes from Miami, where Dolphins offensive lineman Richie Incognito has been suspended for allegedly bullying teammate Jonathan Martin. Incognito is accused of numerous instances of bullying including leaving a vitriolic, racially offensive voicemail for his younger teammate, who eventually left the team due to emotional problems. The things that Incognito has been accused of doing and saying are the exact opposite of how we teach our children to act.

But for some, the blame has been shifted to Martin. He’s “too soft” for the NFL, according to some. Many athletes and writers have tried to shrug off bullying and hazing in NFL locker rooms, saying that the testosterone-fueled sport plays by a different set of rules than the 9-to-5 workaday world. And it does. But we must begin to ask ourselves, has it gone too far?

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